Giant Trance 29 3 2020  Medium
201101310M

Giant Trance 29er 3 2020


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GIANT TRANCE 29 3 (2020)

The new Giant Trance 29 3 is one of those bikes that completely surprises you by how well it rides technical trails. And in this preview, I’m going to explain why and also cover several key components.

But the best reasons for placing the new Trance 29er 3 on your short list are:

If you’re riding intermediate level trails with the occasional single black diamond descent thrown in.

You value pedalling efficiency the most.

And you have just started mountain biking prefer a bike that is extremely stable at high speed and confidence inspiring.

THE TRANCE 29 FRAME

The frame is made from Giant’s premium-grade aluminium called ALUXX SL.

It uses a sophisticated technique (called double-butting) that removes material from areas where it’s not needed and adds it to high load areas.

The tubes are also fluid-formed.

You’ll notice that Giant doesn’t really employ uniform cross-section tubes. The tubes taper and have complicated curves in them. This can only be achieved through fluid forming. Again, to reduce weight and control stiffness.

Although the Giant Trance and Trance 29er share the same name, they are two completely different bikes.

But, what’s different exactly?

First, Giant has designed the Trance 29 to deliver 115mm of rear wheel travel and it’s paired to a 130mm travel fork.

Second, it’s the geometry.

THE TRANCE 29 GEOMETRY

And there’s a bunch of things that are different.

Essentially:

The Trance 29 is the same in the back (435mm long) and slightly more elongated at the front.

Like a sports car right? Short back, long front and your kinda there.

Now, the key details in a snapshot:

The head tube angle is slacker at 66.5-degrees (Trance 29) versus 67.0-degrees.

Seat tube angle is steeper at 74.5-degrees (Trance 29) versus 73.5-degrees.

Trail has been increased from 104mm to 116mm (Trance 29).

This all means:

Even though the Trance 29 has less travel, it will be more stable at high speed. That’s what all the numbers indicate.

Trail is the bike’s self centreing ability. Ever hit a log or rock and the front handlebar has twisted around and you’ve crashed?

That’s because you’re bike’s Trail number is low and head tube angle very steep - causing you to crash.

A bike with a high Trail number, will hit the same rock or tree root, correct itself and keep rolling.

That’s also called stability.

NEW SUSPENSION FOR 2020

The Fox 34 Rhythm (2019) is replaced with the brand new Marzocchi Bomber Z2 (released in July 2019).

I bet you’re asking, “Which is better?”

They’re both almost exactly the same. Fox purchased Marzocchi last year.

I did say almost though.

Here are the differences:

First, the damper isn’t GRIP (like on the Fox) it’s called RAIL. The damper assembly completely separates the compression and rebound circuits.

This is why Fox/Marzocchi did this:

Less moving parts equals cheaper to manufacture.

But it’s easy to think cheaper to manufacture means cheap quality.

Not so.

Marzoochi’s approach to design has always been simplification with premium components.

One such is the black coating on the fork. The anodised surface treatment traps lubricant for longer seal life.

Compared to the Fox 34 Rhythm that was on last years bike, the Z2 is heavier. But it’s also a touch stiffer; a good option for heavy riders or those who are at home on rough rocks and tree roots.

The Marzocchi Z2 has 34mm stanchion tubes just like the Fox 34. It also has air pressure tuning, rebound and a black compression lever (and no indexing clicks).

It also worth noting that just like the Fox 34 you can tune the ramp up or progression using Fox’s green 34 volume spacers.

NEW SRAM SX EAGLE

There are so many 2020 bikes being released with SRAM’s most affordable Eagle groupset - SX.

If you’re new to SRAM Eagle, just note that anything with the Eagle name has a single chain ring that is paired to 12 sprockets on the back.

It’s popularity is due to one thing: range.

The range begins at a tiny 11-tooth sprocket and goes up to a massive 50-tooth sprocket.

The following BikeRadar video delivers some great content on the new group set:

THE WHEELS

The Trance 29 uses Giant’s XCT rim.

These are slightly narrower and lighter than the AM’s used on the Giant Trance. And they’re setup tubeless.

If you’ve never been exposed to tubeless before, for performance mountain bikes it makes a lot of sense:

Firstly, there’s no tubes. It’s replaced by a liquid sealant that coats the inside of the tyre. When you experience a pinch flat, the sealant will plug the offending hole and you can continue riding.

The benefits:

You can run lower pressures and gain extra traction - especially over rocks, slippery tree roots and loose surfaces.

It feels smoother over high speed chattery trails such as exposed tree roots and rocks.

The following video from GMBN illustrates some key reasons for going tubeless:

WARRANTY

  • Lifetime Frame Warranty (to the original owner only).
  • 2 years on SRAM products.
  • 2 years on Giant wheels.
  • 1 year on everything else.

GIANT TRANCE 29 3 (2020)

The new Giant Trance 29 3 is one of those bikes that completely surprises you by how well it rides technical trails. And in this preview, I’m going to explain why and also cover several key components.

But the best reasons for placing the new Trance 29er 3 on your short list are:

If you’re riding intermediate level trails with the occasional single black diamond descent thrown in.

You value pedalling efficiency the most.

And you have just started mountain biking prefer a bike that is extremely stable at high speed and confidence inspiring.

THE TRANCE 29 FRAME

The frame is made from Giant’s premium-grade aluminium called ALUXX SL.

It uses a sophisticated technique (called double-butting) that removes material from areas where it’s not needed and adds it to high load areas.

The tubes are also fluid-formed.

You’ll notice that Giant doesn’t really employ uniform cross-section tubes. The tubes taper and have complicated curves in them. This can only be achieved through fluid forming. Again, to reduce weight and control stiffness.

Although the Giant Trance and Trance 29er share the same name, they are two completely different bikes.

But, what’s different exactly?

First, Giant has designed the Trance 29 to deliver 115mm of rear wheel travel and it’s paired to a 130mm travel fork.

Second, it’s the geometry.

THE TRANCE 29 GEOMETRY

And there’s a bunch of things that are different.

Essentially:

The Trance 29 is the same in the back (435mm long) and slightly more elongated at the front.

Like a sports car right? Short back, long front and your kinda there.

Now, the key details in a snapshot:

The head tube angle is slacker at 66.5-degrees (Trance 29) versus 67.0-degrees.

Seat tube angle is steeper at 74.5-degrees (Trance 29) versus 73.5-degrees.

Trail has been increased from 104mm to 116mm (Trance 29).

This all means:

Even though the Trance 29 has less travel, it will be more stable at high speed. That’s what all the numbers indicate.

Trail is the bike’s self centreing ability. Ever hit a log or rock and the front handlebar has twisted around and you’ve crashed?

That’s because you’re bike’s Trail number is low and head tube angle very steep - causing you to crash.

A bike with a high Trail number, will hit the same rock or tree root, correct itself and keep rolling.

That’s also called stability.

NEW SUSPENSION FOR 2020

The Fox 34 Rhythm (2019) is replaced with the brand new Marzocchi Bomber Z2 (released in July 2019).

I bet you’re asking, “Which is better?”

They’re both almost exactly the same. Fox purchased Marzocchi last year.

I did say almost though.

Here are the differences:

First, the damper isn’t GRIP (like on the Fox) it’s called RAIL. The damper assembly completely separates the compression and rebound circuits.

This is why Fox/Marzocchi did this:

Less moving parts equals cheaper to manufacture.

But it’s easy to think cheaper to manufacture means cheap quality.

Not so.

Marzoochi’s approach to design has always been simplification with premium components.

One such is the black coating on the fork. The anodised surface treatment traps lubricant for longer seal life.

Compared to the Fox 34 Rhythm that was on last years bike, the Z2 is heavier. But it’s also a touch stiffer; a good option for heavy riders or those who are at home on rough rocks and tree roots.

The Marzocchi Z2 has 34mm stanchion tubes just like the Fox 34. It also has air pressure tuning, rebound and a black compression lever (and no indexing clicks).

It also worth noting that just like the Fox 34 you can tune the ramp up or progression using Fox’s green 34 volume spacers.

NEW SRAM SX EAGLE

There are so many 2020 bikes being released with SRAM’s most affordable Eagle groupset - SX.

If you’re new to SRAM Eagle, just note that anything with the Eagle name has a single chain ring that is paired to 12 sprockets on the back.

It’s popularity is due to one thing: range.

The range begins at a tiny 11-tooth sprocket and goes up to a massive 50-tooth sprocket.

The following BikeRadar video delivers some great content on the new group set:

THE WHEELS

The Trance 29 uses Giant’s XCT rim.

These are slightly narrower and lighter than the AM’s used on the Giant Trance. And they’re setup tubeless.

If you’ve never been exposed to tubeless before, for performance mountain bikes it makes a lot of sense:

Firstly, there’s no tubes. It’s replaced by a liquid sealant that coats the inside of the tyre. When you experience a pinch flat, the sealant will plug the offending hole and you can continue riding.

The benefits:

You can run lower pressures and gain extra traction - especially over rocks, slippery tree roots and loose surfaces.

It feels smoother over high speed chattery trails such as exposed tree roots and rocks.

The following video from GMBN illustrates some key reasons for going tubeless:

WARRANTY

  • Lifetime Frame Warranty (to the original owner only).
  • 2 years on SRAM products.
  • 2 years on Giant wheels.
  • 1 year on everything else.

GIANT TRANCE 29 3 (2020)

The new Giant Trance 29 3 is one of those bikes that completely surprises you by how well it rides technical trails. And in this preview, I’m going to explain why and also cover several key components.

But the best reasons for placing the new Trance 29er 3 on your short list are:

If you’re riding intermediate level trails with the occasional single black diamond descent thrown in.

You value pedalling efficiency the most.

And you have just started mountain biking prefer a bike that is extremely stable at high speed and confidence inspiring.

THE TRANCE 29 FRAME

The frame is made from Giant’s premium-grade aluminium called ALUXX SL.

It uses a sophisticated technique (called double-butting) that removes material from areas where it’s not needed and adds it to high load areas.

The tubes are also fluid-formed.

You’ll notice that Giant doesn’t really employ uniform cross-section tubes. The tubes taper and have complicated curves in them. This can only be achieved through fluid forming. Again, to reduce weight and control stiffness.

Although the Giant Trance and Trance 29er share the same name, they are two completely different bikes.

But, what’s different exactly?

First, Giant has designed the Trance 29 to deliver 115mm of rear wheel travel and it’s paired to a 130mm travel fork.

Second, it’s the geometry.

THE TRANCE 29 GEOMETRY

And there’s a bunch of things that are different.

Essentially:

The Trance 29 is the same in the back (435mm long) and slightly more elongated at the front.

Like a sports car right? Short back, long front and your kinda there.

Now, the key details in a snapshot:

The head tube angle is slacker at 66.5-degrees (Trance 29) versus 67.0-degrees.

Seat tube angle is steeper at 74.5-degrees (Trance 29) versus 73.5-degrees.

Trail has been increased from 104mm to 116mm (Trance 29).

This all means:

Even though the Trance 29 has less travel, it will be more stable at high speed. That’s what all the numbers indicate.

Trail is the bike’s self centreing ability. Ever hit a log or rock and the front handlebar has twisted around and you’ve crashed?

That’s because you’re bike’s Trail number is low and head tube angle very steep - causing you to crash.

A bike with a high Trail number, will hit the same rock or tree root, correct itself and keep rolling.

That’s also called stability.

NEW SUSPENSION FOR 2020

The Fox 34 Rhythm (2019) is replaced with the brand new Marzocchi Bomber Z2 (released in July 2019).

I bet you’re asking, “Which is better?”

They’re both almost exactly the same. Fox purchased Marzocchi last year.

I did say almost though.

Here are the differences:

First, the damper isn’t GRIP (like on the Fox) it’s called RAIL. The damper assembly completely separates the compression and rebound circuits.

This is why Fox/Marzocchi did this:

Less moving parts equals cheaper to manufacture.

But it’s easy to think cheaper to manufacture means cheap quality.

Not so.

Marzoochi’s approach to design has always been simplification with premium components.

One such is the black coating on the fork. The anodised surface treatment traps lubricant for longer seal life.

Compared to the Fox 34 Rhythm that was on last years bike, the Z2 is heavier. But it’s also a touch stiffer; a good option for heavy riders or those who are at home on rough rocks and tree roots.

The Marzocchi Z2 has 34mm stanchion tubes just like the Fox 34. It also has air pressure tuning, rebound and a black compression lever (and no indexing clicks).

It also worth noting that just like the Fox 34 you can tune the ramp up or progression using Fox’s green 34 volume spacers.

NEW SRAM SX EAGLE

There are so many 2020 bikes being released with SRAM’s most affordable Eagle groupset - SX.

If you’re new to SRAM Eagle, just note that anything with the Eagle name has a single chain ring that is paired to 12 sprockets on the back.

It’s popularity is due to one thing: range.

The range begins at a tiny 11-tooth sprocket and goes up to a massive 50-tooth sprocket.

The following BikeRadar video delivers some great content on the new group set:

THE WHEELS

The Trance 29 uses Giant’s XCT rim.

These are slightly narrower and lighter than the AM’s used on the Giant Trance. And they’re setup tubeless.

If you’ve never been exposed to tubeless before, for performance mountain bikes it makes a lot of sense:

Firstly, there’s no tubes. It’s replaced by a liquid sealant that coats the inside of the tyre. When you experience a pinch flat, the sealant will plug the offending hole and you can continue riding.

The benefits:

You can run lower pressures and gain extra traction - especially over rocks, slippery tree roots and loose surfaces.

It feels smoother over high speed chattery trails such as exposed tree roots and rocks.

The following video from GMBN illustrates some key reasons for going tubeless:

WARRANTY

  • Lifetime Frame Warranty (to the original owner only).
  • 2 years on SRAM products.
  • 2 years on Giant wheels.
  • 1 year on everything else.
General
Colour
Red
Bike
Pedals
N/A
Gears
Shifter
SRAM SX Eagle
Speeds
12.0
Rear Derailleur
SRAM SX Eagle
Chain
SRAM SX Eagle
Bottom Bracket
SRAM GXP Dub, press fit
Brakes
Brake Levers
Shimano MT401 hydraulic
Wheels
Rims
Giant XCT, tubeless
Spokes
Stainless steel, 14g
Colour Neon Red
Frame ALUXX SL grade aluminium, Maestro 115mm travel, Boost, ISCG 05
Fork Marzocchi Bomber Z2, 15x110, OverDrive steerer, 130mm travel
Shock Fox Float DPS Performance, Trunnion mount
Handlebar Giant Contact trail rise, 35mm
Stem Giant Contact SL, 35mm, 8 degree
Seatpost Giant Contact Switch dropper, 30.9mm
Saddle Giant Contact, Neutral
Pedals N/A
Shifter SRAM SX Eagle, 12 speed
Rear Derailleur SRAM SX Eagle
Brakes Shimano MT400 hydraulic disc, 180mm
Brake Levers Shimano MT401 hydraulic
Cassette SRAM PG1210 Eagle, 11-50T, 12 speed
Chain SRAM SX Eagle
Crankset SRAM SX Eagle, Dub, 30T
Bottom Bracket SRAM GXP DUB, press fit
Rims Giant XCT, tubeless
Hubs Giant Performance Disc, 28H
Spokes Stainless steel, 14g
Tyres Fr: Maxxis Minion DHF, TR, EXO, Folding, 29x2.3” Rr: Maxxis Minion DHR II, TR, EXO, Folding, 29x2.3”
General
Brand
Giant
Bike
Frame Size
Small
General
Brand
Giant
Bike
Frame Size
Large