Giant Trance Advanced Pro 29 2 2020
201100810M

Giant Trance Advanced Pro 29 2 2020


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GIANT TRANCE ADVANCED PRO 29 2 (2020)

This is the first year that Giant has introduced a Trance Advanced Pro 29 2.

The reason:

To make a carbon mountain bike affordable.

Before I launch into the preview, there are two solid reasons why you should consider the Advanced Pro 2:

First, you want the best value for money carbon Trance 29 in the range.

And two, the majority of your riding is going to be intermediate trails with the occasional trip to locations where the riding is raw and technical.

THE FRAME

Anything that says ‘Advanced Pro’ means the complete frame (front and back) is made from carbon.

And it makes a massive difference:

Because it drastically enhances the Trance 29’s frame stiffness.

Resulting in:

Power transfer to the trail that is far quicker.

Carbon is generally a lot stiffer than aluminium. This stiffness improves the Trance 29er’s efficiency because it doesn’t flex as you power through the pedal stroke.

And handling:

The Trance 29er’s carbon frame is torisonal (twisting load) stiffer too.

Riding through chunky rocks or technical tree root sections, every obstacle is trying to twist and force the bike into a direction you don’t want.

But not with carbon.

The bike holds it line better and delivers more control to the rider.

At the heart of the frame is Maestro suspension. Four pivots roll on sealed bearings and are connected to two linkages. The upper link is forged from carbon and further increases the torsional rigidity.

The objective of any dual-suspension mountain bike is to stop rider pedalling forces and brakes from affecting the suspension performance.

Here’s a short video explaining how Maestro works:

GEOMETRY

What makes the Trance Advanced Pro 29er so interesting is the geometry.

Giant wanted to create a short travel bike that was capable of riding seriously technical terrain and was still responsive, agile and stable on fast trails as well.

In short: the trail bike that can do (almost) anything.

This is the how of it:

Short version:

Giant shorted the rear end, lengthened the front of the bike and made the rear shock feel like it’s got more travel than it actually does.

Long version:

First, if Giant was going to make a bike that punches above its weight they had to make the bike far more stable at high speed and in the rough.

So they decreased (slackened) the head tube angle (E) to 66.5-degrees. Not so slack so it can’t climb, but enough so that the front wheel stays planted on the trail at warp speed.

Then Giant increased the seat tube angle (B) to 74.5-degrees. This position’s your pelvis over the rear shock and just forward of the bottom bracket.

A combination of head tube angle (E) and fork rake (F) has resulted in a Trail (G) of almost 117mm. Surprisingly, this is so close to the Giant Reign which has a Trail number of 120mm.

The result:

It’s going to close to the stability you get from the Reign and in a far more pedal friendly package.

Here’s a short development video on the Giant Trance 29er:

FOX SUSPENSION

A Fox 34 Float Rhythm and Float DPS help suspend the Trance Advanced Pro 29 2.

The Rhythm is the most affordable fork in Fox’s performance range. It’s been designed for those riders who want to get a little more serious into their mountain biking.

Without turning into a complete nerd, the Rhythm is a closed-system like the high end Fox stuff.

Meaning:

The air part and the oil part are in separate chambers. This way they don’t mix and cause cavitation (air bubbles in the oil). Because, when this happens the suspension gets firmer and starts to feel harsh - something you definitely don’t want.

The Float DPS rear shock is perhaps the most popular product on cross-country and trail bikes. Because it works on such a varied terrain; from fast, smooth trails to raw, technical singletrack.

It can do (almost) anything.

Both units feature:

Air pressure that can be tuned for each rider to deliver the correct amount of sag. For the correct pressure, check out the tuning guides below.

Rebound (the red dial) controls the speed of the suspension after it’s absorbed the impact. As an example, for rocky trails you want the suspension returning fast. On smooth, flowy trails set it slower for more controlled response.

It’s a fine balance and something that you will need to experiment with over time. These tuning guides will help you get to your personal suspension setting faster:

Fox 34 Float Rhythm

Fox Float DPS

NEW CARBON WHEELS

The Giant TRX 1 carbon wheels are specifically designed for trail riding.

This means:

The carbon layup uses Giant’s new Impact Resistant Design - a whole new design profile that was introduced in 2019.

Let me explain:

First, as part of the restructuring Giant made all their performance rims hookless.

This makes the rim wider at 30mm inner and 37mm outer - on point with modern trends.

The lines at the left side of the above image represent the flow of carbon fibres. Note how there are no abrupt changes in direction; all the fibres flow smoothly. This reduces any weakness in the rim, and is often where they crack.

And to further strengthen the rim, Giant has increased the rim bed to 3.5mm.

Second, the inner rim shape has been redesigned. It has a larger diameter inner radius (the solid blue line) that increases the strength.

Fine tuning the carbon layup in this area and around the spoke holes has reinforced the complete inner rim.

The weight of the Giant TRX 1 Composite wheels are 1,750 grams.

The rims are laced to DT Swiss 360 hubs that use a pawl driver. And the bearings are completely sealed too; significantly reducing rolling friction and maintenance.

SRAM EAGLE

Has been dominating mountain bikes for the last three years.

For one reason: Range.

Anything SRAM Eagle has 12 gears paired to a single front chain ring. The range on the rear cassette is 11-tooth to 50-tooth for the Trance Advanced Pro 29er 2.

There are various levels on the Eagle range, this one uses the SRAM NX Eagle groupset. NX is fourth-tier and one of the most affordable.

Here is the SRAM Eagle development video that shows how it all works:

The NX Eagle groupset is paired to SRAM Guide T hydraulic disc brakes.

These use the new S4 caliper:

It’s a four-piston caliper that has moly-coated aluminium pistons for frictionless piston movement. Heat Shield tech reduces caliper fluid temperature by 20-degrees.

GIANT TRANCE ADVANCED PRO 29 2 (2020)

This is the first year that Giant has introduced a Trance Advanced Pro 29 2.

The reason:

To make a carbon mountain bike affordable.

Before I launch into the preview, there are two solid reasons why you should consider the Advanced Pro 2:

First, you want the best value for money carbon Trance 29 in the range.

And two, the majority of your riding is going to be intermediate trails with the occasional trip to locations where the riding is raw and technical.

THE FRAME

Anything that says ‘Advanced Pro’ means the complete frame (front and back) is made from carbon.

And it makes a massive difference:

Because it drastically enhances the Trance 29’s frame stiffness.

Resulting in:

Power transfer to the trail that is far quicker.

Carbon is generally a lot stiffer than aluminium. This stiffness improves the Trance 29er’s efficiency because it doesn’t flex as you power through the pedal stroke.

And handling:

The Trance 29er’s carbon frame is torisonal (twisting load) stiffer too.

Riding through chunky rocks or technical tree root sections, every obstacle is trying to twist and force the bike into a direction you don’t want.

But not with carbon.

The bike holds it line better and delivers more control to the rider.

At the heart of the frame is Maestro suspension. Four pivots roll on sealed bearings and are connected to two linkages. The upper link is forged from carbon and further increases the torsional rigidity.

The objective of any dual-suspension mountain bike is to stop rider pedalling forces and brakes from affecting the suspension performance.

Here’s a short video explaining how Maestro works:

GEOMETRY

What makes the Trance Advanced Pro 29er so interesting is the geometry.

Giant wanted to create a short travel bike that was capable of riding seriously technical terrain and was still responsive, agile and stable on fast trails as well.

In short: the trail bike that can do (almost) anything.

This is the how of it:

Short version:

Giant shorted the rear end, lengthened the front of the bike and made the rear shock feel like it’s got more travel than it actually does.

Long version:

First, if Giant was going to make a bike that punches above its weight they had to make the bike far more stable at high speed and in the rough.

So they decreased (slackened) the head tube angle (E) to 66.5-degrees. Not so slack so it can’t climb, but enough so that the front wheel stays planted on the trail at warp speed.

Then Giant increased the seat tube angle (B) to 74.5-degrees. This position’s your pelvis over the rear shock and just forward of the bottom bracket.

A combination of head tube angle (E) and fork rake (F) has resulted in a Trail (G) of almost 117mm. Surprisingly, this is so close to the Giant Reign which has a Trail number of 120mm.

The result:

It’s going to close to the stability you get from the Reign and in a far more pedal friendly package.

Here’s a short development video on the Giant Trance 29er:

FOX SUSPENSION

A Fox 34 Float Rhythm and Float DPS help suspend the Trance Advanced Pro 29 2.

The Rhythm is the most affordable fork in Fox’s performance range. It’s been designed for those riders who want to get a little more serious into their mountain biking.

Without turning into a complete nerd, the Rhythm is a closed-system like the high end Fox stuff.

Meaning:

The air part and the oil part are in separate chambers. This way they don’t mix and cause cavitation (air bubbles in the oil). Because, when this happens the suspension gets firmer and starts to feel harsh - something you definitely don’t want.

The Float DPS rear shock is perhaps the most popular product on cross-country and trail bikes. Because it works on such a varied terrain; from fast, smooth trails to raw, technical singletrack.

It can do (almost) anything.

Both units feature:

Air pressure that can be tuned for each rider to deliver the correct amount of sag. For the correct pressure, check out the tuning guides below.

Rebound (the red dial) controls the speed of the suspension after it’s absorbed the impact. As an example, for rocky trails you want the suspension returning fast. On smooth, flowy trails set it slower for more controlled response.

It’s a fine balance and something that you will need to experiment with over time. These tuning guides will help you get to your personal suspension setting faster:

Fox 34 Float Rhythm

Fox Float DPS

NEW CARBON WHEELS

The Giant TRX 1 carbon wheels are specifically designed for trail riding.

This means:

The carbon layup uses Giant’s new Impact Resistant Design - a whole new design profile that was introduced in 2019.

Let me explain:

First, as part of the restructuring Giant made all their performance rims hookless.

This makes the rim wider at 30mm inner and 37mm outer - on point with modern trends.

The lines at the left side of the above image represent the flow of carbon fibres. Note how there are no abrupt changes in direction; all the fibres flow smoothly. This reduces any weakness in the rim, and is often where they crack.

And to further strengthen the rim, Giant has increased the rim bed to 3.5mm.

Second, the inner rim shape has been redesigned. It has a larger diameter inner radius (the solid blue line) that increases the strength.

Fine tuning the carbon layup in this area and around the spoke holes has reinforced the complete inner rim.

The weight of the Giant TRX 1 Composite wheels are 1,750 grams.

The rims are laced to DT Swiss 360 hubs that use a pawl driver. And the bearings are completely sealed too; significantly reducing rolling friction and maintenance.

SRAM EAGLE

Has been dominating mountain bikes for the last three years.

For one reason: Range.

Anything SRAM Eagle has 12 gears paired to a single front chain ring. The range on the rear cassette is 11-tooth to 50-tooth for the Trance Advanced Pro 29er 2.

There are various levels on the Eagle range, this one uses the SRAM NX Eagle groupset. NX is fourth-tier and one of the most affordable.

Here is the SRAM Eagle development video that shows how it all works:

The NX Eagle groupset is paired to SRAM Guide T hydraulic disc brakes.

These use the new S4 caliper:

It’s a four-piston caliper that has moly-coated aluminium pistons for frictionless piston movement. Heat Shield tech reduces caliper fluid temperature by 20-degrees.

GIANT TRANCE ADVANCED PRO 29 2 (2020)

This is the first year that Giant has introduced a Trance Advanced Pro 29 2.

The reason:

To make a carbon mountain bike affordable.

Before I launch into the preview, there are two solid reasons why you should consider the Advanced Pro 2:

First, you want the best value for money carbon Trance 29 in the range.

And two, the majority of your riding is going to be intermediate trails with the occasional trip to locations where the riding is raw and technical.

THE FRAME

Anything that says ‘Advanced Pro’ means the complete frame (front and back) is made from carbon.

And it makes a massive difference:

Because it drastically enhances the Trance 29’s frame stiffness.

Resulting in:

Power transfer to the trail that is far quicker.

Carbon is generally a lot stiffer than aluminium. This stiffness improves the Trance 29er’s efficiency because it doesn’t flex as you power through the pedal stroke.

And handling:

The Trance 29er’s carbon frame is torisonal (twisting load) stiffer too.

Riding through chunky rocks or technical tree root sections, every obstacle is trying to twist and force the bike into a direction you don’t want.

But not with carbon.

The bike holds it line better and delivers more control to the rider.

At the heart of the frame is Maestro suspension. Four pivots roll on sealed bearings and are connected to two linkages. The upper link is forged from carbon and further increases the torsional rigidity.

The objective of any dual-suspension mountain bike is to stop rider pedalling forces and brakes from affecting the suspension performance.

Here’s a short video explaining how Maestro works:

GEOMETRY

What makes the Trance Advanced Pro 29er so interesting is the geometry.

Giant wanted to create a short travel bike that was capable of riding seriously technical terrain and was still responsive, agile and stable on fast trails as well.

In short: the trail bike that can do (almost) anything.

This is the how of it:

Short version:

Giant shorted the rear end, lengthened the front of the bike and made the rear shock feel like it’s got more travel than it actually does.

Long version:

First, if Giant was going to make a bike that punches above its weight they had to make the bike far more stable at high speed and in the rough.

So they decreased (slackened) the head tube angle (E) to 66.5-degrees. Not so slack so it can’t climb, but enough so that the front wheel stays planted on the trail at warp speed.

Then Giant increased the seat tube angle (B) to 74.5-degrees. This position’s your pelvis over the rear shock and just forward of the bottom bracket.

A combination of head tube angle (E) and fork rake (F) has resulted in a Trail (G) of almost 117mm. Surprisingly, this is so close to the Giant Reign which has a Trail number of 120mm.

The result:

It’s going to close to the stability you get from the Reign and in a far more pedal friendly package.

Here’s a short development video on the Giant Trance 29er:

FOX SUSPENSION

A Fox 34 Float Rhythm and Float DPS help suspend the Trance Advanced Pro 29 2.

The Rhythm is the most affordable fork in Fox’s performance range. It’s been designed for those riders who want to get a little more serious into their mountain biking.

Without turning into a complete nerd, the Rhythm is a closed-system like the high end Fox stuff.

Meaning:

The air part and the oil part are in separate chambers. This way they don’t mix and cause cavitation (air bubbles in the oil). Because, when this happens the suspension gets firmer and starts to feel harsh - something you definitely don’t want.

The Float DPS rear shock is perhaps the most popular product on cross-country and trail bikes. Because it works on such a varied terrain; from fast, smooth trails to raw, technical singletrack.

It can do (almost) anything.

Both units feature:

Air pressure that can be tuned for each rider to deliver the correct amount of sag. For the correct pressure, check out the tuning guides below.

Rebound (the red dial) controls the speed of the suspension after it’s absorbed the impact. As an example, for rocky trails you want the suspension returning fast. On smooth, flowy trails set it slower for more controlled response.

It’s a fine balance and something that you will need to experiment with over time. These tuning guides will help you get to your personal suspension setting faster:

Fox 34 Float Rhythm

Fox Float DPS

NEW CARBON WHEELS

The Giant TRX 1 carbon wheels are specifically designed for trail riding.

This means:

The carbon layup uses Giant’s new Impact Resistant Design - a whole new design profile that was introduced in 2019.

Let me explain:

First, as part of the restructuring Giant made all their performance rims hookless.

This makes the rim wider at 30mm inner and 37mm outer - on point with modern trends.

The lines at the left side of the above image represent the flow of carbon fibres. Note how there are no abrupt changes in direction; all the fibres flow smoothly. This reduces any weakness in the rim, and is often where they crack.

And to further strengthen the rim, Giant has increased the rim bed to 3.5mm.

Second, the inner rim shape has been redesigned. It has a larger diameter inner radius (the solid blue line) that increases the strength.

Fine tuning the carbon layup in this area and around the spoke holes has reinforced the complete inner rim.

The weight of the Giant TRX 1 Composite wheels are 1,750 grams.

The rims are laced to DT Swiss 360 hubs that use a pawl driver. And the bearings are completely sealed too; significantly reducing rolling friction and maintenance.

SRAM EAGLE

Has been dominating mountain bikes for the last three years.

For one reason: Range.

Anything SRAM Eagle has 12 gears paired to a single front chain ring. The range on the rear cassette is 11-tooth to 50-tooth for the Trance Advanced Pro 29er 2.

There are various levels on the Eagle range, this one uses the SRAM NX Eagle groupset. NX is fourth-tier and one of the most affordable.

Here is the SRAM Eagle development video that shows how it all works:

The NX Eagle groupset is paired to SRAM Guide T hydraulic disc brakes.

These use the new S4 caliper:

It’s a four-piston caliper that has moly-coated aluminium pistons for frictionless piston movement. Heat Shield tech reduces caliper fluid temperature by 20-degrees.

GIANT TRANCE ADVANCED PRO 29 2 (2020)

This is the first year that Giant has introduced a Trance Advanced Pro 29 2.

The reason:

To make a carbon mountain bike affordable.

Before I launch into the preview, there are two solid reasons why you should consider the Advanced Pro 2:

First, you want the best value for money carbon Trance 29 in the range.

And two, the majority of your riding is going to be intermediate trails with the occasional trip to locations where the riding is raw and technical.

THE FRAME

Anything that says ‘Advanced Pro’ means the complete frame (front and back) is made from carbon.

And it makes a massive difference:

Because it drastically enhances the Trance 29’s frame stiffness.

Resulting in:

Power transfer to the trail that is far quicker.

Carbon is generally a lot stiffer than aluminium. This stiffness improves the Trance 29er’s efficiency because it doesn’t flex as you power through the pedal stroke.

And handling:

The Trance 29er’s carbon frame is torisonal (twisting load) stiffer too.

Riding through chunky rocks or technical tree root sections, every obstacle is trying to twist and force the bike into a direction you don’t want.

But not with carbon.

The bike holds it line better and delivers more control to the rider.

At the heart of the frame is Maestro suspension. Four pivots roll on sealed bearings and are connected to two linkages. The upper link is forged from carbon and further increases the torsional rigidity.

The objective of any dual-suspension mountain bike is to stop rider pedalling forces and brakes from affecting the suspension performance.

Here’s a short video explaining how Maestro works:

GEOMETRY

What makes the Trance Advanced Pro 29er so interesting is the geometry.

Giant wanted to create a short travel bike that was capable of riding seriously technical terrain and was still responsive, agile and stable on fast trails as well.

In short: the trail bike that can do (almost) anything.

This is the how of it:

Short version:

Giant shorted the rear end, lengthened the front of the bike and made the rear shock feel like it’s got more travel than it actually does.

Long version:

First, if Giant was going to make a bike that punches above its weight they had to make the bike far more stable at high speed and in the rough.

So they decreased (slackened) the head tube angle (E) to 66.5-degrees. Not so slack so it can’t climb, but enough so that the front wheel stays planted on the trail at warp speed.

Then Giant increased the seat tube angle (B) to 74.5-degrees. This position’s your pelvis over the rear shock and just forward of the bottom bracket.

A combination of head tube angle (E) and fork rake (F) has resulted in a Trail (G) of almost 117mm. Surprisingly, this is so close to the Giant Reign which has a Trail number of 120mm.

The result:

It’s going to close to the stability you get from the Reign and in a far more pedal friendly package.

Here’s a short development video on the Giant Trance 29er:

FOX SUSPENSION

A Fox 34 Float Rhythm and Float DPS help suspend the Trance Advanced Pro 29 2.

The Rhythm is the most affordable fork in Fox’s performance range. It’s been designed for those riders who want to get a little more serious into their mountain biking.

Without turning into a complete nerd, the Rhythm is a closed-system like the high end Fox stuff.

Meaning:

The air part and the oil part are in separate chambers. This way they don’t mix and cause cavitation (air bubbles in the oil). Because, when this happens the suspension gets firmer and starts to feel harsh - something you definitely don’t want.

The Float DPS rear shock is perhaps the most popular product on cross-country and trail bikes. Because it works on such a varied terrain; from fast, smooth trails to raw, technical singletrack.

It can do (almost) anything.

Both units feature:

Air pressure that can be tuned for each rider to deliver the correct amount of sag. For the correct pressure, check out the tuning guides below.

Rebound (the red dial) controls the speed of the suspension after it’s absorbed the impact. As an example, for rocky trails you want the suspension returning fast. On smooth, flowy trails set it slower for more controlled response.

It’s a fine balance and something that you will need to experiment with over time. These tuning guides will help you get to your personal suspension setting faster:

Fox 34 Float Rhythm

Fox Float DPS

NEW CARBON WHEELS

The Giant TRX 1 carbon wheels are specifically designed for trail riding.

This means:

The carbon layup uses Giant’s new Impact Resistant Design - a whole new design profile that was introduced in 2019.

Let me explain:

First, as part of the restructuring Giant made all their performance rims hookless.

This makes the rim wider at 30mm inner and 37mm outer - on point with modern trends.

The lines at the left side of the above image represent the flow of carbon fibres. Note how there are no abrupt changes in direction; all the fibres flow smoothly. This reduces any weakness in the rim, and is often where they crack.

And to further strengthen the rim, Giant has increased the rim bed to 3.5mm.

Second, the inner rim shape has been redesigned. It has a larger diameter inner radius (the solid blue line) that increases the strength.

Fine tuning the carbon layup in this area and around the spoke holes has reinforced the complete inner rim.

The weight of the Giant TRX 1 Composite wheels are 1,750 grams.

The rims are laced to DT Swiss 360 hubs that use a pawl driver. And the bearings are completely sealed too; significantly reducing rolling friction and maintenance.

SRAM EAGLE

Has been dominating mountain bikes for the last three years.

For one reason: Range.

Anything SRAM Eagle has 12 gears paired to a single front chain ring. The range on the rear cassette is 11-tooth to 50-tooth for the Trance Advanced Pro 29er 2.

There are various levels on the Eagle range, this one uses the SRAM NX Eagle groupset. NX is fourth-tier and one of the most affordable.

Here is the SRAM Eagle development video that shows how it all works:

The NX Eagle groupset is paired to SRAM Guide T hydraulic disc brakes.

These use the new S4 caliper:

It’s a four-piston caliper that has moly-coated aluminium pistons for frictionless piston movement. Heat Shield tech reduces caliper fluid temperature by 20-degrees.

Colour Copper
Frame Advanced grade composite main frame, Advanced grade composite rear triangle, Maestro 115mm travel, Boost, ISCG 05
Fork Fox 34 Float Rhythm, 15x110 Kabolt axle, OverDrive steerer, 130mm travel
Shock Fox Float DPS Performance, Trunnion mount
Handlebar Giant Contact trail rise, 35mm
Stem Giant Contact SL, 35mm, 8 degree
Seatpost Giant Contact Switch dropper, 30.9mm
Saddle Giant Contact, Neutral
Pedals N/A
Shifter SRAM NX Eagle, 12 speed
Rear Derailleur SRAM NX Eagle
Brakes SRAM Guide T hydraulic disc, 180mm
Brake Levers SRAM Guide T hydraulic
Cassette SRAM PG-1230 Eagle, 11-50T, 12 speed
Chain SRAM NX Eagle
Crankset Truvativ Descendant Eagle, DUB, 30T
Bottom Bracket SRAM GXP DUB, press fit
Rims Giant TRX 1 29 Hookless Composite, DBL, WheelSystem
Hubs Giant TRX 1 29 Hookless Composite, DBL, WheelSystem, 28H
Spokes Giant TRX 1 29 Hookless Composite, DBL, WheelSystem
Tyres Fr: Maxxis Minion DHF, TR, 3C, EXO, Folding, 29x2.3” Rr: Maxxis Minion DHR II, TR, 3C, EXO, Folding, 29x2.3”
Colour Copper
Frame Advanced grade composite main frame, Advanced grade composite rear triangle, Maestro 115mm travel, Boost, ISCG 05
Fork Fox 34 Float Rhythm, 15x110 Kabolt axle, OverDrive steerer, 130mm travel
Shock Fox Float DPS Performance, Trunnion mount
Handlebar Giant Contact trail rise, 35mm
Stem Giant Contact SL, 35mm, 8 degree
Seatpost Giant Contact Switch dropper, 30.9mm
Saddle Giant Contact, Neutral
Pedals N/A
Shifter SRAM NX Eagle, 12 speed
Rear Derailleur SRAM NX Eagle
Brakes SRAM Guide T hydraulic disc, 180mm
Brake Levers SRAM Guide T hydraulic
Cassette SRAM PG-1230 Eagle, 11-50T, 12 speed
Chain SRAM NX Eagle
Crankset Truvativ Descendant Eagle, DUB, 30T
Bottom Bracket SRAM GXP DUB, press fit
Rims Giant TRX 1 29 Hookless Composite, DBL, WheelSystem
Hubs Giant TRX 1 29 Hookless Composite, DBL, WheelSystem, 28H
Spokes Giant TRX 1 29 Hookless Composite, DBL, WheelSystem
Tyres Fr: Maxxis Minion DHF, TR, 3C, EXO, Folding, 29x2.3” Rr: Maxxis Minion DHR II, TR, 3C, EXO, Folding, 29x2.3”
General
Brand
Giant
Bike
Frame Size
Medium
General
Brand
Giant
Bike
Frame Size
Large
Frame Lifetime Warranty (to the original owner)
SRAM 2 years
Wheels 2 years
Everything Else 1 year
Frame Lifetime Warranty (to the original owner)
SRAM 2 years
Wheels 2 years
Everything Else 1 year
Frame Lifetime Warranty (to the original owner)
SRAM 2 years
Wheels 2 years
Everything Else 1 year
Frame Lifetime Warranty (to the original owner)
SRAM 2 years
Wheels 2 years
Everything Else 1 year