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Rocky Mountain Slayer Carbon 50 2020
Rocky Mountain

Rocky Mountain Slayer Carbon 50 29 2020 - Grey

77041626256M
$200 deposit
Total price: $8,599

Click & Collect :

  • Please note that due to a high volume of online orders, processing times can take up to 48 hours.
  • For same-day or next-day collection, please order by phone.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SLAYER CARBON 50 (2020) - GREY

I’m standing beside the Slayer Carbon 50 in XL, at the top of a long and grueling climb. I’m staring at it.

And I’m thinking:

How the hell did it just do that?

Unbeknownst to me, this was going to be my main reaction on many, many occasions as I got to know the new Slayer.

I’d just come back testing the brand new 2020 Reign 29 2. This has 160mm front travel and 146mm of rear wheel travel. On 29-inch wheels.

The Reign 29’s climbing efficiency was good, and so was its character on descents.

But:

Something was missing. And it left me feeling - flat.

So, it was with some reluctance that I agreed to test the new Slayer Carbon 50.

170mm of front and rear travel, paired to 29-inch wheels? More than the already flat Reign 29?

You’re kidding.

In my mind, it was a foregone conclusion.

I’d return the Slayer C50 to the boys at Rocky Mountain, thank them for their efforts, tell them the new Slayer is a big, heavy tank and no one except Vanderham and Storch can ride one. Let alone the Average Joe, like me. And call it a day.

I was wrong.


THE MASTERPIECE

Longer reach. Steeper seat angle. Slacker head tube angle. Neutral bottom bracket height.

Ride 4. With an updated rocker link that looks very sophisticated.

So, it’s a thoroughly modern hardcore Big Mountain/Freeride mountain bike.

But we knew that.

So let’s look at the truly important details.

Opinions might be divided. Me? I think it looks stunning.

It has a presence. It has pedigree.

Compared to brands like Specialized, it’s the underdog. Hell, everyone knows it.

Except nobody told the Slayer that.

You can tell that a lot of thought and love has been invested. And it’s taken 25 years to get here.

Rocky told us it’s the stiffest frame they’ve ever made.

I believe it.

There’s no give in the Slayer C50.

Put the power down and it responds.

Choose a line through a rock garden or tree roots and it follows the exact path you pick out.

Bold, strong lines sculpted from the best carbon fibre and Rocky Mountain wizardry hint at the beast within.

It’s going to be sick.

CANADIAN WITCHCRAFT (CLIMBING)

And that’s exactly what it is.

I was dismayed when I read that it’s a bit over 15kg.

It shouldn’t climb like it does. I’ve ridden bikes that are lighter, with less travel that don’t climb as efficiently as the Slayer does.

Now:

Don’t misunderstand. You’re probably not going to set a new KOM or be the fastest climber in your group of buddies that ride Trail bikes.

But:

For a bike that has 170mm of rear wheel travel transferred through a coil shock, it climbs more like a 150mm bike.

And as long you’re seated, the Slayer is a very comfortable climber.

Which leads me back to my first sentence:

How the hell did it just do that?

First, it has amazing (and I mean truly incredible) mid-travel support.

It doesn’t wallow.

And has a progression curve that matches the coil spring beautifully - almost like magic.

That means it only uses the amount of travel that’s needed by the climb.

The coil spring in this instance actually helps the Slayer climb to.

Actually, it’s not just this.

Rocky’s mountain bikes have this incredible ability to generate grip and smoothly ‘flow’ over harsh square edge impacts.

That’s what I noticed with the Slayer. It smoothly accelerates over tree roots and rocks. Constantly surprising me with it’s ability to get up tricky climbs.

And I rode two types of climbs.

The steep, tight and rocky climbs of the 2006 Commonwealth Games course at Lysterfield Park.

And:

The longer undulating climbs of Baker’s Dozen and Twisted Sister at Silvan. These were scattered with very tight switchbacks and steep punchy inclines.

‘Power on, power off’ kind of terrain. Brutal - especially after your 4th time.

After one such long days, I thought:

Unless your downhill trails are technically demanding, the Aggressor in the DD (Double Defence) construction might be a little too heavy. Changing it for the Exo+ casing would make the Slayer a little snappier on climbs.

I never changed it though.

Because what I felt descending, would make me forget the climb completely.

It was time to unleash the beast.

BEAST MODE (DESCENDING)

I’m not a great descender. I don’t do huge gap jumps and I like my wheels on the ground.

In other words, when I go downhill I play defence. Always reacting, never attacking.

However, the Slayer didn’t know this.

It’s fast.

And it’s furious speed, balanced by it’s stability and insane grip, brought me many, many moments of total bliss.

I actually stopped halfway down JJ’s (Silvan) to absorb the moment.

I had never landed that drop with such finesse and smoothness. The Slayer was already charging for the corner even before I appreciated how bloody smooth that landing was.

I’d never attempted to gap anything down JJ’S. But with the Slayer I was connecting parts of the trail I never thought possible. Smoothly linking one corner with the next. Like levitation.

Nothing could break my flow.

F#$%. I felt like Vanderham.

The same mid-travel support that got me to the top of the climb was helping me generate stupid amounts of speed on the descents.

Before riding the 170mm Slayer, if you’d told me the bike was going to be poppy, playful and easy to ride, I would have laughed in your face.

I’m not laughing now.

Push the bike into compressions and it rewards you with free speed on the exit.

Ride deep into a berm and it carves through dirt and exits with satisfyingly little effort, already hungry for the next trail feature.

Smart riders will use the Slayer C50’s mid-stroke support in dips and compressions on the trail. This will help you generate speed, conserve energy and maintain momentum.

It’s an easy bike to ride fast.

As this was my first experience riding a coil shock; I noticed how smooth all the impacts felt.

However, the word ‘smooth’ doesn’t do it justice and nor does it come close to describing the sensation. It’s also immediately apparent that you’re riding Rock Shox’s top-of-the-range coil shock - the Super Deluxe Coil Ultimate.

I talk about small bump performance a lot on other bikes. But the Slayer’s suspension curve paired to the Ultimate Coil, takes my experience of small bump performance to a whole new level.

I’ve never felt so much smoothness paired with enormous traction and grip.

Braking bumps don’t exist. Rock armouring over berms doesn’t exist. And rock gardens don’t exist.

At 78kg, the stock 450lb spring rate on the XL frame was perfect.

The rear shock has Sag Gradients marked out on the shaft. This makes setup so much easier, and you’ll be able to determine whether the spring rate is correct very quickly.

A low-speed compression dial adjusts how soft or hard you want the initial part of the travel to feel. For Lysterfield, I set the 3-4 clicks firmer than what I did for Silvan. It’s a quick and easy way to deliver more pedal support without sacrificing too much small bump performance.

COMPONENT MENTIONS

Shimano 12-speed: This was my first experience with Shimano Deore XT/SLX/SLX 4-piston brakes.

And it was a good one.

For the last 18 months, I’ve been using SRAM GX Eagle 12-speed. Shift performance on both is superb. The difference I noticed was:

In Shimano’s ability to fill one or two gear gaps. I felt like my cadence wasn’t being affected as much because there was a gentle progression in the gears.

And:

Shifting under power on the Shimano was exceptional. No half shifts or praying it goes into gear as your pedalling out corners or standing up and changing gear.

Rock Shox Lyrik Select: The new Lyrik Select RC comes with Torque Caps. This resulted in a significant difference when you charged through sections of rocks and off-camber tree roots. The front end of the Slayer always stayed precise and direct. The Lyrik performed brilliantly.

OneUp dropper post: The cool thing about this post is that it can be adjusted internally to whatever drop length you prefer (within a range).

The lever was really well designed too. The small issue with it is that it’s bolted to the brake lever. It does create a really lean look but also limits adjustability. A separate clamp can be used for the remote though and it will fix the issue.

Frame SMOOTHWALL Carbon Front Triangle. FORM Alloy Rear Triangle. Full Sealed Cartridge Bearings. Press Fit BB. Internal Cable Routing. RIDE-4 Adjustable Geometry.
Fork RockShox Lyrik Select RC 29: 170mm 42mm Offset, 170mm travel (200mm Dual Crown Compatible)
Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Coil Ultimate RCT, MD = 350 lb / LG = 400 lb / XL = 450 lb, 170mm rear wheel travel
Headset FSA Orbit NO.57E
Stem Rocky Mountain 35 AM
Handlebar Rocky Mountain AM 780mm
Grips Rocky Mountain Lock On XC
Brakes Shimano SLX Trail 4 Piston / Shimano RT66 203mm / Shimano RT66 203mm
Brake Levers Shimano SLX Trail 4 Piston
Shifter Shimano SLX 12-speed
Rear Derailleur Shimano XT
Cranks & Chainrings Race Face Aeffect Cinch 32T Steel
Bottom Bracket Shimano SM-BBMT500
Cassette Shimano SLX 10-51T 12-speed
Chain Shimano HG7100 12-speed
Front Hub Rocky Mountain Sealed Boost 15mm with Torque Caps
Rear Hub DT Swiss 370 Boost 148mm
Spokes DT Swiss Champion 2.0
Rims WTB ST i30 TCS 2.0 Tubeless
Tyres Maxxis Minion DHF WT Double Down Maxx Grip 3C Tubeless Ready 29x2.50” / Maxxis Aggressor WT Double Down Tubeless Ready 29x2.50”
Dropper Post OneUp Dropper Post 30.9mm
Saddle WTB Volt Race 142
Weight 15.44 KG

Due to Covid 19, the above bicycle specifications may vary without notice. We will strive to advertise specifications accurately.

Mens Mountain Performance Sports Bike Sizing Guide

This guide is a reference only. For a better fit, please visit your local store and speak to our inhouse experts.

Rocky Mountain Slayer Carbon 50 2020

Rocky Mountain Slayer Carbon 50 2020 Medium

770416271003
$200 deposit
Total price: $8,599

Want to click and collect?

Available at Heidelberg.

Click & Collect :

  • Please note that due to a high volume of online orders, processing times can take up to 48 hours.
  • For same-day or next-day collection, please order by phone.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SLAYER CARBON 50 (2020) - GREY

I’m standing beside the Slayer Carbon 50 in XL, at the top of a long and grueling climb. I’m staring at it.

And I’m thinking:

How the hell did it just do that?

Unbeknownst to me, this was going to be my main reaction on many, many occasions as I got to know the new Slayer.

I’d just come back testing the brand new 2020 Reign 29 2. This has 160mm front travel and 146mm of rear wheel travel. On 29-inch wheels.

The Reign 29’s climbing efficiency was good, and so was its character on descents.

But:

Something was missing. And it left me feeling - flat.

So, it was with some reluctance that I agreed to test the new Slayer Carbon 50.

170mm of front and rear travel, paired to 29-inch wheels? More than the already flat Reign 29?

You’re kidding.

In my mind, it was a foregone conclusion.

I’d return the Slayer C50 to the boys at Rocky Mountain, thank them for their efforts, tell them the new Slayer is a big, heavy tank and no one except Vanderham and Storch can ride one. Let alone the Average Joe, like me. And call it a day.

I was wrong.


THE MASTERPIECE

Longer reach. Steeper seat angle. Slacker head tube angle. Neutral bottom bracket height.

Ride 4. With an updated rocker link that looks very sophisticated.

So, it’s a thoroughly modern hardcore Big Mountain/Freeride mountain bike.

But we knew that.

So let’s look at the truly important details.

Opinions might be divided. Me? I think it looks stunning.

It has a presence. It has pedigree.

Compared to brands like Specialized, it’s the underdog. Hell, everyone knows it.

Except nobody told the Slayer that.

You can tell that a lot of thought and love has been invested. And it’s taken 25 years to get here.

Rocky told us it’s the stiffest frame they’ve ever made.

I believe it.

There’s no give in the Slayer C50.

Put the power down and it responds.

Choose a line through a rock garden or tree roots and it follows the exact path you pick out.

Bold, strong lines sculpted from the best carbon fibre and Rocky Mountain wizardry hint at the beast within.

It’s going to be sick.

CANADIAN WITCHCRAFT (CLIMBING)

And that’s exactly what it is.

I was dismayed when I read that it’s a bit over 15kg.

It shouldn’t climb like it does. I’ve ridden bikes that are lighter, with less travel that don’t climb as efficiently as the Slayer does.

Now:

Don’t misunderstand. You’re probably not going to set a new KOM or be the fastest climber in your group of buddies that ride Trail bikes.

But:

For a bike that has 170mm of rear wheel travel transferred through a coil shock, it climbs more like a 150mm bike.

And as long you’re seated, the Slayer is a very comfortable climber.

Which leads me back to my first sentence:

How the hell did it just do that?

First, it has amazing (and I mean truly incredible) mid-travel support.

It doesn’t wallow.

And has a progression curve that matches the coil spring beautifully - almost like magic.

That means it only uses the amount of travel that’s needed by the climb.

The coil spring in this instance actually helps the Slayer climb to.

Actually, it’s not just this.

Rocky’s mountain bikes have this incredible ability to generate grip and smoothly ‘flow’ over harsh square edge impacts.

That’s what I noticed with the Slayer. It smoothly accelerates over tree roots and rocks. Constantly surprising me with it’s ability to get up tricky climbs.

And I rode two types of climbs.

The steep, tight and rocky climbs of the 2006 Commonwealth Games course at Lysterfield Park.

And:

The longer undulating climbs of Baker’s Dozen and Twisted Sister at Silvan. These were scattered with very tight switchbacks and steep punchy inclines.

‘Power on, power off’ kind of terrain. Brutal - especially after your 4th time.

After one such long days, I thought:

Unless your downhill trails are technically demanding, the Aggressor in the DD (Double Defence) construction might be a little too heavy. Changing it for the Exo+ casing would make the Slayer a little snappier on climbs.

I never changed it though.

Because what I felt descending, would make me forget the climb completely.

It was time to unleash the beast.

BEAST MODE (DESCENDING)

I’m not a great descender. I don’t do huge gap jumps and I like my wheels on the ground.

In other words, when I go downhill I play defence. Always reacting, never attacking.

However, the Slayer didn’t know this.

It’s fast.

And it’s furious speed, balanced by it’s stability and insane grip, brought me many, many moments of total bliss.

I actually stopped halfway down JJ’s (Silvan) to absorb the moment.

I had never landed that drop with such finesse and smoothness. The Slayer was already charging for the corner even before I appreciated how bloody smooth that landing was.

I’d never attempted to gap anything down JJ’S. But with the Slayer I was connecting parts of the trail I never thought possible. Smoothly linking one corner with the next. Like levitation.

Nothing could break my flow.

F#$%. I felt like Vanderham.

The same mid-travel support that got me to the top of the climb was helping me generate stupid amounts of speed on the descents.

Before riding the 170mm Slayer, if you’d told me the bike was going to be poppy, playful and easy to ride, I would have laughed in your face.

I’m not laughing now.

Push the bike into compressions and it rewards you with free speed on the exit.

Ride deep into a berm and it carves through dirt and exits with satisfyingly little effort, already hungry for the next trail feature.

Smart riders will use the Slayer C50’s mid-stroke support in dips and compressions on the trail. This will help you generate speed, conserve energy and maintain momentum.

It’s an easy bike to ride fast.

As this was my first experience riding a coil shock; I noticed how smooth all the impacts felt.

However, the word ‘smooth’ doesn’t do it justice and nor does it come close to describing the sensation. It’s also immediately apparent that you’re riding Rock Shox’s top-of-the-range coil shock - the Super Deluxe Coil Ultimate.

I talk about small bump performance a lot on other bikes. But the Slayer’s suspension curve paired to the Ultimate Coil, takes my experience of small bump performance to a whole new level.

I’ve never felt so much smoothness paired with enormous traction and grip.

Braking bumps don’t exist. Rock armouring over berms doesn’t exist. And rock gardens don’t exist.

At 78kg, the stock 450lb spring rate on the XL frame was perfect.

The rear shock has Sag Gradients marked out on the shaft. This makes setup so much easier, and you’ll be able to determine whether the spring rate is correct very quickly.

A low-speed compression dial adjusts how soft or hard you want the initial part of the travel to feel. For Lysterfield, I set the 3-4 clicks firmer than what I did for Silvan. It’s a quick and easy way to deliver more pedal support without sacrificing too much small bump performance.

COMPONENT MENTIONS

Shimano 12-speed: This was my first experience with Shimano Deore XT/SLX/SLX 4-piston brakes.

And it was a good one.

For the last 18 months, I’ve been using SRAM GX Eagle 12-speed. Shift performance on both is superb. The difference I noticed was:

In Shimano’s ability to fill one or two gear gaps. I felt like my cadence wasn’t being affected as much because there was a gentle progression in the gears.

And:

Shifting under power on the Shimano was exceptional. No half shifts or praying it goes into gear as your pedalling out corners or standing up and changing gear.

Rock Shox Lyrik Select: The new Lyrik Select RC comes with Torque Caps. This resulted in a significant difference when you charged through sections of rocks and off-camber tree roots. The front end of the Slayer always stayed precise and direct. The Lyrik performed brilliantly.

OneUp dropper post: The cool thing about this post is that it can be adjusted internally to whatever drop length you prefer (within a range).

The lever was really well designed too. The small issue with it is that it’s bolted to the brake lever. It does create a really lean look but also limits adjustability. A separate clamp can be used for the remote though and it will fix the issue.

Frame SMOOTHWALL Carbon Front Triangle. FORM Alloy Rear Triangle. Full Sealed Cartridge Bearings. Press Fit BB. Internal Cable Routing. RIDE-4 Adjustable Geometry.
Fork RockShox Lyrik Select RC 29: 170mm 42mm Offset, 170mm travel (200mm Dual Crown Compatible)
Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Coil Ultimate RCT, MD = 350 lb / LG = 400 lb / XL = 450 lb, 170mm rear wheel travel
Headset FSA Orbit NO.57E
Stem Rocky Mountain 35 AM
Handlebar Rocky Mountain AM 780mm
Grips Rocky Mountain Lock On XC
Brakes Shimano SLX Trail 4 Piston / Shimano RT66 203mm / Shimano RT66 203mm
Brake Levers Shimano SLX Trail 4 Piston
Shifter Shimano SLX 12-speed
Rear Derailleur Shimano XT
Cranks & Chainrings Race Face Aeffect Cinch 32T Steel
Bottom Bracket Shimano SM-BBMT500
Cassette Shimano SLX 10-51T 12-speed
Chain Shimano HG7100 12-speed
Front Hub Rocky Mountain Sealed Boost 15mm with Torque Caps
Rear Hub DT Swiss 370 Boost 148mm
Spokes DT Swiss Champion 2.0
Rims WTB ST i30 TCS 2.0 Tubeless
Tyres Maxxis Minion DHF WT Double Down Maxx Grip 3C Tubeless Ready 29x2.50” / Maxxis Aggressor WT Double Down Tubeless Ready 29x2.50”
Dropper Post OneUp Dropper Post 30.9mm
Saddle WTB Volt Race 142
Weight 15.44 KG

Due to Covid 19, the above bicycle specifications may vary without notice. We will strive to advertise specifications accurately.

Mens Mountain Performance Sports Bike Sizing Guide

This guide is a reference only. For a better fit, please visit your local store and speak to our inhouse experts.

Rocky Mountain Slayer Carbon 50 2020

Rocky Mountain Slayer Carbon 50 2020 Large

770416262568
Unavailable

Click & Collect :

  • Please note that due to a high volume of online orders, processing times can take up to 48 hours.
  • For same-day or next-day collection, please order by phone.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SLAYER CARBON 50 (2020) - GREY

I’m standing beside the Slayer Carbon 50 in XL, at the top of a long and grueling climb. I’m staring at it.

And I’m thinking:

How the hell did it just do that?

Unbeknownst to me, this was going to be my main reaction on many, many occasions as I got to know the new Slayer.

I’d just come back testing the brand new 2020 Reign 29 2. This has 160mm front travel and 146mm of rear wheel travel. On 29-inch wheels.

The Reign 29’s climbing efficiency was good, and so was its character on descents.

But:

Something was missing. And it left me feeling - flat.

So, it was with some reluctance that I agreed to test the new Slayer Carbon 50.

170mm of front and rear travel, paired to 29-inch wheels? More than the already flat Reign 29?

You’re kidding.

In my mind, it was a foregone conclusion.

I’d return the Slayer C50 to the boys at Rocky Mountain, thank them for their efforts, tell them the new Slayer is a big, heavy tank and no one except Vanderham and Storch can ride one. Let alone the Average Joe, like me. And call it a day.

I was wrong.


THE MASTERPIECE

Longer reach. Steeper seat angle. Slacker head tube angle. Neutral bottom bracket height.

Ride 4. With an updated rocker link that looks very sophisticated.

So, it’s a thoroughly modern hardcore Big Mountain/Freeride mountain bike.

But we knew that.

So let’s look at the truly important details.

Opinions might be divided. Me? I think it looks stunning.

It has a presence. It has pedigree.

Compared to brands like Specialized, it’s the underdog. Hell, everyone knows it.

Except nobody told the Slayer that.

You can tell that a lot of thought and love has been invested. And it’s taken 25 years to get here.

Rocky told us it’s the stiffest frame they’ve ever made.

I believe it.

There’s no give in the Slayer C50.

Put the power down and it responds.

Choose a line through a rock garden or tree roots and it follows the exact path you pick out.

Bold, strong lines sculpted from the best carbon fibre and Rocky Mountain wizardry hint at the beast within.

It’s going to be sick.

CANADIAN WITCHCRAFT (CLIMBING)

And that’s exactly what it is.

I was dismayed when I read that it’s a bit over 15kg.

It shouldn’t climb like it does. I’ve ridden bikes that are lighter, with less travel that don’t climb as efficiently as the Slayer does.

Now:

Don’t misunderstand. You’re probably not going to set a new KOM or be the fastest climber in your group of buddies that ride Trail bikes.

But:

For a bike that has 170mm of rear wheel travel transferred through a coil shock, it climbs more like a 150mm bike.

And as long you’re seated, the Slayer is a very comfortable climber.

Which leads me back to my first sentence:

How the hell did it just do that?

First, it has amazing (and I mean truly incredible) mid-travel support.

It doesn’t wallow.

And has a progression curve that matches the coil spring beautifully - almost like magic.

That means it only uses the amount of travel that’s needed by the climb.

The coil spring in this instance actually helps the Slayer climb to.

Actually, it’s not just this.

Rocky’s mountain bikes have this incredible ability to generate grip and smoothly ‘flow’ over harsh square edge impacts.

That’s what I noticed with the Slayer. It smoothly accelerates over tree roots and rocks. Constantly surprising me with it’s ability to get up tricky climbs.

And I rode two types of climbs.

The steep, tight and rocky climbs of the 2006 Commonwealth Games course at Lysterfield Park.

And:

The longer undulating climbs of Baker’s Dozen and Twisted Sister at Silvan. These were scattered with very tight switchbacks and steep punchy inclines.

‘Power on, power off’ kind of terrain. Brutal - especially after your 4th time.

After one such long days, I thought:

Unless your downhill trails are technically demanding, the Aggressor in the DD (Double Defence) construction might be a little too heavy. Changing it for the Exo+ casing would make the Slayer a little snappier on climbs.

I never changed it though.

Because what I felt descending, would make me forget the climb completely.

It was time to unleash the beast.

BEAST MODE (DESCENDING)

I’m not a great descender. I don’t do huge gap jumps and I like my wheels on the ground.

In other words, when I go downhill I play defence. Always reacting, never attacking.

However, the Slayer didn’t know this.

It’s fast.

And it’s furious speed, balanced by it’s stability and insane grip, brought me many, many moments of total bliss.

I actually stopped halfway down JJ’s (Silvan) to absorb the moment.

I had never landed that drop with such finesse and smoothness. The Slayer was already charging for the corner even before I appreciated how bloody smooth that landing was.

I’d never attempted to gap anything down JJ’S. But with the Slayer I was connecting parts of the trail I never thought possible. Smoothly linking one corner with the next. Like levitation.

Nothing could break my flow.

F#$%. I felt like Vanderham.

The same mid-travel support that got me to the top of the climb was helping me generate stupid amounts of speed on the descents.

Before riding the 170mm Slayer, if you’d told me the bike was going to be poppy, playful and easy to ride, I would have laughed in your face.

I’m not laughing now.

Push the bike into compressions and it rewards you with free speed on the exit.

Ride deep into a berm and it carves through dirt and exits with satisfyingly little effort, already hungry for the next trail feature.

Smart riders will use the Slayer C50’s mid-stroke support in dips and compressions on the trail. This will help you generate speed, conserve energy and maintain momentum.

It’s an easy bike to ride fast.

As this was my first experience riding a coil shock; I noticed how smooth all the impacts felt.

However, the word ‘smooth’ doesn’t do it justice and nor does it come close to describing the sensation. It’s also immediately apparent that you’re riding Rock Shox’s top-of-the-range coil shock - the Super Deluxe Coil Ultimate.

I talk about small bump performance a lot on other bikes. But the Slayer’s suspension curve paired to the Ultimate Coil, takes my experience of small bump performance to a whole new level.

I’ve never felt so much smoothness paired with enormous traction and grip.

Braking bumps don’t exist. Rock armouring over berms doesn’t exist. And rock gardens don’t exist.

At 78kg, the stock 450lb spring rate on the XL frame was perfect.

The rear shock has Sag Gradients marked out on the shaft. This makes setup so much easier, and you’ll be able to determine whether the spring rate is correct very quickly.

A low-speed compression dial adjusts how soft or hard you want the initial part of the travel to feel. For Lysterfield, I set the 3-4 clicks firmer than what I did for Silvan. It’s a quick and easy way to deliver more pedal support without sacrificing too much small bump performance.

COMPONENT MENTIONS

Shimano 12-speed: This was my first experience with Shimano Deore XT/SLX/SLX 4-piston brakes.

And it was a good one.

For the last 18 months, I’ve been using SRAM GX Eagle 12-speed. Shift performance on both is superb. The difference I noticed was:

In Shimano’s ability to fill one or two gear gaps. I felt like my cadence wasn’t being affected as much because there was a gentle progression in the gears.

And:

Shifting under power on the Shimano was exceptional. No half shifts or praying it goes into gear as your pedalling out corners or standing up and changing gear.

Rock Shox Lyrik Select: The new Lyrik Select RC comes with Torque Caps. This resulted in a significant difference when you charged through sections of rocks and off-camber tree roots. The front end of the Slayer always stayed precise and direct. The Lyrik performed brilliantly.

OneUp dropper post: The cool thing about this post is that it can be adjusted internally to whatever drop length you prefer (within a range).

The lever was really well designed too. The small issue with it is that it’s bolted to the brake lever. It does create a really lean look but also limits adjustability. A separate clamp can be used for the remote though and it will fix the issue.

Frame SMOOTHWALL Carbon Front Triangle. FORM Alloy Rear Triangle. Full Sealed Cartridge Bearings. Press Fit BB. Internal Cable Routing. RIDE-4 Adjustable Geometry.
Fork RockShox Lyrik Select RC 29: 170mm 42mm Offset, 170mm travel (200mm Dual Crown Compatible)
Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Coil Ultimate RCT, MD = 350 lb / LG = 400 lb / XL = 450 lb, 170mm rear wheel travel
Headset FSA Orbit NO.57E
Stem Rocky Mountain 35 AM
Handlebar Rocky Mountain AM 780mm
Grips Rocky Mountain Lock On XC
Brakes Shimano SLX Trail 4 Piston / Shimano RT66 203mm / Shimano RT66 203mm
Brake Levers Shimano SLX Trail 4 Piston
Shifter Shimano SLX 12-speed
Rear Derailleur Shimano XT
Cranks & Chainrings Race Face Aeffect Cinch 32T Steel
Bottom Bracket Shimano SM-BBMT500
Cassette Shimano SLX 10-51T 12-speed
Chain Shimano HG7100 12-speed
Front Hub Rocky Mountain Sealed Boost 15mm with Torque Caps
Rear Hub DT Swiss 370 Boost 148mm
Spokes DT Swiss Champion 2.0
Rims WTB ST i30 TCS 2.0 Tubeless
Tyres Maxxis Minion DHF WT Double Down Maxx Grip 3C Tubeless Ready 29x2.50” / Maxxis Aggressor WT Double Down Tubeless Ready 29x2.50”
Dropper Post OneUp Dropper Post 30.9mm
Saddle WTB Volt Race 142
Weight 15.44 KG

Due to Covid 19, the above bicycle specifications may vary without notice. We will strive to advertise specifications accurately.

Mens Mountain Performance Sports Bike Sizing Guide

This guide is a reference only. For a better fit, please visit your local store and speak to our inhouse experts.

Rocky Mountain Slayer Carbon 50 2020

Rocky Mountain Slayer Carbon 50 2020 XL

770416271041
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ROCKY MOUNTAIN SLAYER CARBON 50 (2020) - GREY

I’m standing beside the Slayer Carbon 50 in XL, at the top of a long and grueling climb. I’m staring at it.

And I’m thinking:

How the hell did it just do that?

Unbeknownst to me, this was going to be my main reaction on many, many occasions as I got to know the new Slayer.

I’d just come back testing the brand new 2020 Reign 29 2. This has 160mm front travel and 146mm of rear wheel travel. On 29-inch wheels.

The Reign 29’s climbing efficiency was good, and so was its character on descents.

But:

Something was missing. And it left me feeling - flat.

So, it was with some reluctance that I agreed to test the new Slayer Carbon 50.

170mm of front and rear travel, paired to 29-inch wheels? More than the already flat Reign 29?

You’re kidding.

In my mind, it was a foregone conclusion.

I’d return the Slayer C50 to the boys at Rocky Mountain, thank them for their efforts, tell them the new Slayer is a big, heavy tank and no one except Vanderham and Storch can ride one. Let alone the Average Joe, like me. And call it a day.

I was wrong.


THE MASTERPIECE

Longer reach. Steeper seat angle. Slacker head tube angle. Neutral bottom bracket height.

Ride 4. With an updated rocker link that looks very sophisticated.

So, it’s a thoroughly modern hardcore Big Mountain/Freeride mountain bike.

But we knew that.

So let’s look at the truly important details.

Opinions might be divided. Me? I think it looks stunning.

It has a presence. It has pedigree.

Compared to brands like Specialized, it’s the underdog. Hell, everyone knows it.

Except nobody told the Slayer that.

You can tell that a lot of thought and love has been invested. And it’s taken 25 years to get here.

Rocky told us it’s the stiffest frame they’ve ever made.

I believe it.

There’s no give in the Slayer C50.

Put the power down and it responds.

Choose a line through a rock garden or tree roots and it follows the exact path you pick out.

Bold, strong lines sculpted from the best carbon fibre and Rocky Mountain wizardry hint at the beast within.

It’s going to be sick.

CANADIAN WITCHCRAFT (CLIMBING)

And that’s exactly what it is.

I was dismayed when I read that it’s a bit over 15kg.

It shouldn’t climb like it does. I’ve ridden bikes that are lighter, with less travel that don’t climb as efficiently as the Slayer does.

Now:

Don’t misunderstand. You’re probably not going to set a new KOM or be the fastest climber in your group of buddies that ride Trail bikes.

But:

For a bike that has 170mm of rear wheel travel transferred through a coil shock, it climbs more like a 150mm bike.

And as long you’re seated, the Slayer is a very comfortable climber.

Which leads me back to my first sentence:

How the hell did it just do that?

First, it has amazing (and I mean truly incredible) mid-travel support.

It doesn’t wallow.

And has a progression curve that matches the coil spring beautifully - almost like magic.

That means it only uses the amount of travel that’s needed by the climb.

The coil spring in this instance actually helps the Slayer climb to.

Actually, it’s not just this.

Rocky’s mountain bikes have this incredible ability to generate grip and smoothly ‘flow’ over harsh square edge impacts.

That’s what I noticed with the Slayer. It smoothly accelerates over tree roots and rocks. Constantly surprising me with it’s ability to get up tricky climbs.

And I rode two types of climbs.

The steep, tight and rocky climbs of the 2006 Commonwealth Games course at Lysterfield Park.

And:

The longer undulating climbs of Baker’s Dozen and Twisted Sister at Silvan. These were scattered with very tight switchbacks and steep punchy inclines.

‘Power on, power off’ kind of terrain. Brutal - especially after your 4th time.

After one such long days, I thought:

Unless your downhill trails are technically demanding, the Aggressor in the DD (Double Defence) construction might be a little too heavy. Changing it for the Exo+ casing would make the Slayer a little snappier on climbs.

I never changed it though.

Because what I felt descending, would make me forget the climb completely.

It was time to unleash the beast.

BEAST MODE (DESCENDING)

I’m not a great descender. I don’t do huge gap jumps and I like my wheels on the ground.

In other words, when I go downhill I play defence. Always reacting, never attacking.

However, the Slayer didn’t know this.

It’s fast.

And it’s furious speed, balanced by it’s stability and insane grip, brought me many, many moments of total bliss.

I actually stopped halfway down JJ’s (Silvan) to absorb the moment.

I had never landed that drop with such finesse and smoothness. The Slayer was already charging for the corner even before I appreciated how bloody smooth that landing was.

I’d never attempted to gap anything down JJ’S. But with the Slayer I was connecting parts of the trail I never thought possible. Smoothly linking one corner with the next. Like levitation.

Nothing could break my flow.

F#$%. I felt like Vanderham.

The same mid-travel support that got me to the top of the climb was helping me generate stupid amounts of speed on the descents.

Before riding the 170mm Slayer, if you’d told me the bike was going to be poppy, playful and easy to ride, I would have laughed in your face.

I’m not laughing now.

Push the bike into compressions and it rewards you with free speed on the exit.

Ride deep into a berm and it carves through dirt and exits with satisfyingly little effort, already hungry for the next trail feature.

Smart riders will use the Slayer C50’s mid-stroke support in dips and compressions on the trail. This will help you generate speed, conserve energy and maintain momentum.

It’s an easy bike to ride fast.

As this was my first experience riding a coil shock; I noticed how smooth all the impacts felt.

However, the word ‘smooth’ doesn’t do it justice and nor does it come close to describing the sensation. It’s also immediately apparent that you’re riding Rock Shox’s top-of-the-range coil shock - the Super Deluxe Coil Ultimate.

I talk about small bump performance a lot on other bikes. But the Slayer’s suspension curve paired to the Ultimate Coil, takes my experience of small bump performance to a whole new level.

I’ve never felt so much smoothness paired with enormous traction and grip.

Braking bumps don’t exist. Rock armouring over berms doesn’t exist. And rock gardens don’t exist.

At 78kg, the stock 450lb spring rate on the XL frame was perfect.

The rear shock has Sag Gradients marked out on the shaft. This makes setup so much easier, and you’ll be able to determine whether the spring rate is correct very quickly.

A low-speed compression dial adjusts how soft or hard you want the initial part of the travel to feel. For Lysterfield, I set the 3-4 clicks firmer than what I did for Silvan. It’s a quick and easy way to deliver more pedal support without sacrificing too much small bump performance.

COMPONENT MENTIONS

Shimano 12-speed: This was my first experience with Shimano Deore XT/SLX/SLX 4-piston brakes.

And it was a good one.

For the last 18 months, I’ve been using SRAM GX Eagle 12-speed. Shift performance on both is superb. The difference I noticed was:

In Shimano’s ability to fill one or two gear gaps. I felt like my cadence wasn’t being affected as much because there was a gentle progression in the gears.

And:

Shifting under power on the Shimano was exceptional. No half shifts or praying it goes into gear as your pedalling out corners or standing up and changing gear.

Rock Shox Lyrik Select: The new Lyrik Select RC comes with Torque Caps. This resulted in a significant difference when you charged through sections of rocks and off-camber tree roots. The front end of the Slayer always stayed precise and direct. The Lyrik performed brilliantly.

OneUp dropper post: The cool thing about this post is that it can be adjusted internally to whatever drop length you prefer (within a range).

The lever was really well designed too. The small issue with it is that it’s bolted to the brake lever. It does create a really lean look but also limits adjustability. A separate clamp can be used for the remote though and it will fix the issue.

Frame SMOOTHWALL Carbon Front Triangle. FORM Alloy Rear Triangle. Full Sealed Cartridge Bearings. Press Fit BB. Internal Cable Routing. RIDE-4 Adjustable Geometry.
Fork RockShox Lyrik Select RC 29: 170mm 42mm Offset, 170mm travel (200mm Dual Crown Compatible)
Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Coil Ultimate RCT, MD = 350 lb / LG = 400 lb / XL = 450 lb, 170mm rear wheel travel
Headset FSA Orbit NO.57E
Stem Rocky Mountain 35 AM
Handlebar Rocky Mountain AM 780mm
Grips Rocky Mountain Lock On XC
Brakes Shimano SLX Trail 4 Piston / Shimano RT66 203mm / Shimano RT66 203mm
Brake Levers Shimano SLX Trail 4 Piston
Shifter Shimano SLX 12-speed
Rear Derailleur Shimano XT
Cranks & Chainrings Race Face Aeffect Cinch 32T Steel
Bottom Bracket Shimano SM-BBMT500
Cassette Shimano SLX 10-51T 12-speed
Chain Shimano HG7100 12-speed
Front Hub Rocky Mountain Sealed Boost 15mm with Torque Caps
Rear Hub DT Swiss 370 Boost 148mm
Spokes DT Swiss Champion 2.0
Rims WTB ST i30 TCS 2.0 Tubeless
Tyres Maxxis Minion DHF WT Double Down Maxx Grip 3C Tubeless Ready 29x2.50” / Maxxis Aggressor WT Double Down Tubeless Ready 29x2.50”
Dropper Post OneUp Dropper Post 30.9mm
Saddle WTB Volt Race 142
Weight 15.44 KG

Due to Covid 19, the above bicycle specifications may vary without notice. We will strive to advertise specifications accurately.

Mens Mountain Performance Sports Bike Sizing Guide

This guide is a reference only. For a better fit, please visit your local store and speak to our inhouse experts.

Chat with an expert...